Thursday, July 21, 2016

Teaching and Learning Links of the Week: July 21, 2016

A roundup of four intriguing or informative posts and articles from around the internet:

“Educators see gold in Pok√©mon Go”
Greg Toppo provides an overview of the new app that has become an overnight sensation and how educators might use it to their advantage.   

“A Practical Approach for Increasing Students’ In-Class Questions”
Steve Snyder presents a framework for developing students’ abilities to formulate questions in order to promote thinking skills and generate deeper discussions.

“Training to Teach: Preparing for the Other Half of Academia”
Travis Bernardo describes resources for graduate students interested in faculty positions to improve the teaching half of their CV.    

“Learning More about Active Learning”
David Gooblar discusses the importance of learning the "whys" behind active learning strategies.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Teaching and Learning Links of the Week: July 15, 2016




A roundup of four intriguing or informative posts and articles from around the internet:

“Providing exemplar-based ‘feedforward’ before an assessment: The role of teacher explanation”
G. Hendry, P. White, and C. Herbert present the results of their study on whether feedforward improve students’ written work or not. You can read their analysis and the implications for teachers. 

“Framing Office Hours as Tutoring”  
Amanda Joyce describes how her rebranding her office hours led to more structure and more students taking advantage of them. 

“Virtual Reality on the Horizon”
Carl Straumsheim presents the current state of affairs as far as the adoption of virtual reality in the classroom is concerned. This is a good read for anyone not familiar with the topic.

“Five Ways to Help Students Succeed in the Online Classroom”
Amy Hankins offers practical instructions that can improve students’ experience in online courses. Her suggestions have the potential to streamline instructors’ work as well.  

Friday, July 8, 2016

Teaching and Learning Links of the Week: July 8, 2016

Teaching & Learning Links to See This Week
A roundup of four intriguing or informative posts and articles from the around the internet:

"Discussion Points and Protocols"
In this third installment of posts on classroom discussions, educator Lolita Paff shares some studies and her own thoughts on student motivation, class policies, and assessment techniques in a discussion. Be sure to also check out parts 1 and 2 of the series, linked in the post. 

"Learning More About Active Learning"
'Active learning' is a buzzword thrown around often these days-but what does it mean, beyond the strategies and teaching techniques? One professor argues that in order to truly help students learn, we must understand how they learn.

"Teaching Students to Be Public Intellectuals"
It's becoming easier than ever for students (both graduate and undergraduate) to share their academic thoughts and work with non-academics. How can we ensure that they recognize the relationship between scholarly and public practices and are effectively engaging in public discourse?

"FSU Researchers Assess Florida Developmental Education Reform"
Two years after state-mandated developmental education reform to the Florida College System, a report shows early evidence of the reform’s impact on student success.


Do you know of an interesting article that you would like to share with the ATLE community? Let us know! Email atle@usf.edu

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Teaching & Learning Links to See This Week, June 24, 2016


Teaching & Learning Links to See This Week
A roundup of four intriguing or informative posts and articles from around the internet:

“Why Teaching May Truly Be the World’s Most Important career”
Research shows that a teacher’s impact on shaping a student’s life is staggering.  Barack Obama in 2008 (when he was first a president) said it all: “The single most important factor in determining [student] achievement is not the color of their skin or where they come from. It’s not who their parents are or how much money they have. It’s who their teacher is.” To read more go to:

Playing Games Can Yield Serious Learning
Contrary to the common beliefs, the college classroom can be fun. “An atmosphere of playfulness may work wonders in creating community and building student engagement.” You don’t necessarily have to have high-tech video games. This article shares some interesting ways to turn your quizzes or group work into interactive competitive games.

Benefits of Talking with Students about Mid-Course Evaluations
Talking to students about formative mid-course evaluation (opposed to what is officially collected at end of the semester) takes a certain amount of courage from the instructor. However, collected data can be very useful in enhancing teaching and learning for students during the same semester and for future iterations of the course.


Are We Too Preoccupied with Teaching Techniques?
“There’s a tendency to think that having more techniques is all that’s needed to become a better teacher. Collecting techniques is fine, but it’s the first and easiest part of a pretty complicated process.” Techniques are essential, but we need to figure out which technique is the best or most appropriate for each context. Focusing too much on the techniques may sidetrack us from what really matters.


Do you know of an interesting article that you would like to share with the ATLE community? Let us know! Email atle@usf.edu

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Teaching and Learning Links of the Week: June 9, 2016

Teaching & Learning Links to See This Week
A roundup of four intriguing or informative posts and articles from around the internet:

“This Picture Tells a Story”
Leonard Cassuto addresses the present crisis in the humanities with honesty and proposes a very straightforward solution: prepare our graduate students to become teachers.

“Frame Your Feedback: Making Peer Review Work in Class”

If you were ever dissatisfied with the quality of peer feedback in your classes, Christina Moore’s article can definitely help you and, most importantly, help your students offer and receive better feedback from their colleagues.

Examining charisma in relation to students’ interest in learning

Shu-Hui Lin and Yun-Chen Huang answer an always pertinent question: does it matter whether students like a teacher or not? You can read the conclusion to their study here:

Preventing Cell Phone Use in the Classroom

Rodney C. Roberts offers the reader a quick tip on how to stop students from using their phones during classes and exams.